Hulunbuir is a pristine "green land" ideal for human habitation, a natural wonderland gifted by nature. Most of its forests, grasslands and lakes remain in primordial form. The four distinct seasons each boast captivating scenery.

In spring, fiery azaleas bloom resplendently amidst lingering snowy peaks in May, creating a holy scene. Summers are pleasant, with average temperatures of 16-21°C, making it a perfect summer retreat. Autumn highlights are the brilliant colors of the seas of trees, with pine winds whispering as the white birches stand dignified, leaving one spellbound by nature's beauty.

Winter turns Hulunbuir into an icy, jade-carved world, with landscapes of frosty peaks, snowy ridges and ice sculptures exuding poetic charm. Roam the snowy forests and appreciate the majestic pine trees magnificently adorned in snow. Hulunbuir's pristine wilderness and dramatic seasonal changes provide a natural wonderland for visitors.

Nadam Conference

Of all the festivals on the grasslands, the most folkloric is the Nadam Fair. "Nadam" means entertainment or games in Mongolian. It is a traditional Mongolian mass gathering, usually held during the golden season of summer and autumn. Events focus on competitions like wrestling, archery, and horse racing.

Every July, the land of blue skies comes alive when nomads gather for the Nadam Fair. Witness eagle hunting and archery on horseback honed over centuries. Thrill to traditional Mongolian sports of wrestling and horse racing. Sample dairy delicacies as you immerse yourself in vibrant cultural exhibits. Against the backdrop of the boundless grasslands, Hulunbuir's Nadam Fair offers a gateway into the enduring nomadic culture of Inner Mongolia.

Sacrificing Aobao

The Obo worship ceremony is one of the most solemn religious rituals of the Mongolian ethnicity. Obo are sacred places to Mongolian herders. Every year on the 12th and 13th day of the 5th lunar month, herders gather from all around to worship at the obo. They first hold horse races, then set up offerings. Lamas chant scriptures and conduct rituals while attendees add stones to the obo. The ceremony is hosted by a widely respected elder, who distributes the offerings after the rituals. Games follow, mainly the "three masculine skills" of wrestling, archery and horse racing.

Time: 12th - 13th day of the 5th lunar month annually.

Join in the Obo harvest celebration of nomadic culture. Witness riders honing archery skills atop galloping steeds. Thrill to traditional competitions of wrestling and horse racing. Sample dairy delicacies as you immerse yourself in vibrant cultural exhibits. Against the endless grasslands, Hulunbuir's Obo ceremony offers a window into the spiritual traditions of Inner Mongolia's herding communities.

Ewenkserbin Festival

"Sebine" means "joy and harmony" in the Oroqen language. It is the traditional festival of the Oroqen ethnic group, featuring folk song and dance performances, traditional Oroqen sports competitions like Bok, Bolong, horse racing, camel racing, wooden cart racing, and Quyue pole climbing.

Join in the revelry of the Sebine Festival, where Oroqen traditions come alive. Thrill to daring pole climbing and camel racing across the windswept grasslands. Enjoy vibrant song and dance celebrating the season's bounty. Sample Oroqen delicacies like grilled fish as you browse exhibits of ethnic handicrafts. Against the endless blue skies, Hulunbuir's Sebine Festival offers a joyful gateway into Oroqen culture.

Oroqen Bonfire Festival

June 18th is the traditional festival of the Orochen ethnic group - the Bonfire Festival. The Orochen have long worshipped the Fire God, believing fire drives away evil spirits and impurities. They have many strict taboos surrounding fire. On this day, the Orochen people sit around a raging bonfire, singing and dancing.

On summer solstice, join the Orochen for their Bonfire Festival. At nightfall, marvel at leaping flames rising against the endless grasslands. Listen to joyful songs celebrating the season's bounty. Share stories and songs with new friends as the fire crackles. Sample Orochen delicacies like grilled fish as you learn about their deep bond with the land. Hulunbuir's Bonfire Festival offers a window into Orochen heritage.

Aoluguya Deer Tribe Cultural Festival

On this festival day in Genhe City's Oluguya Township, there are competitive events like building a Suolazi (teepee-style dwelling), log sawing, and reindeer lasso throwing. There are also exhibitions of handicrafts like leather boots, knives, and birch bark creations. Performances include shaman dances, sacred tree ceremonies, ethnic song and dance, and bonfire dances.

Time: June

Celebrate summer solstice with the Oluguya Reindeer Tribe at their lively cultural festival. Thrill to traditional skills like log chopping and lasso throwing. Sample delicacies of roasted reindeer meat as you browse handicrafts and leatherwork. Join in shamanistic dances honoring the forest spirits. As the glowing bonfire lights up the night sky, immerse yourself in the enduring heritage of Inner Mongolia's northern forests.

Ewenki Mikuolu Festival

The Oroqen Miqulu Festival is the harvest festival of the Oroqen people, celebrated widely in Inner Mongolia's Chen Barag Banner. It is the Oroqen herders' happiest day of the year. On this day, people round up horses for branding, trim sheep hooves, notch sheep ears, shear sheep, and more. After finishing these tasks, people visit each other and hold feasts, songs, dances and other festivities to celebrate the harvest.

Time: The 22nd day of the 5th lunar month annually.

Join in the revelry of Miqulu, the harvest celebration of the Oroqen herders. Witness the important traditions of horse branding and sheep shearing. Sample Oroqen delicacies like grilled fish as you take in vibrant songs and dances. Against the endless blue skies, Hulunbuir's Miqulu Festival offers a joyful window into the age-old customs of the northern grasslands.

Basque Festival

The Bask Festival is the most solemn and lively festival of the year for the Russian descendants in the region. On the festival night, elders give gifts to children, while youths pay respects to elders and wish them well. At night, people gather together to sing, dance, and make merry.

Time: April 26th to early May.

Join in the revelry of the Bask Festival, where Russian heritage comes alive. On this spring night, receive gifts and blessings from community elders. Dance hand-in-hand and sing folk songs late into the night. Sample Russian dishes like borscht and blini pancakes. Against the tranquil Songhua River, the Bask Festival offers a spirited celebration of Hulunbuir's diverse history.

Chasing horses on the prairie

The endless grassy expanse of Hulunbuir welcomes you to one of the world’s four great prairies. Here the windswept Mongolian steppe beckons your spirit to roam free. Mount a sturdy steed and let it take you on a galloping adventure across these boundless verdant meadows. With no fences in sight, give yourself over to the horse’s rhythmic strides. Hooves thunder as you surge ahead in unity with your mount. Feel the mighty strength pulsing through its muscles as you drive faster over hill and dale. The crisp air whips against your face, clearing your mind of all but this moment of exhilaration. Without a care, surrender to the graceful power carrying you forward. Lose yourself in the dance of horse and rider, achieving perfect harmony. Return energized, having touched the wild and beautiful heart of Inner Mongolia's grasslands. You’ll forever cherish the magic found in riding freely under the open sky.

Tasting Russian style cuisine in a fairy tale town

Nestled along the Eerguna River on the Chinese-Russian border lies the fairy tale town of Linjiangtun. With its log cabin architecture and Russian character, this charming village transports you to another world. Meet smiling uncles with Russian features but Northeastern Mandarin accents. Browse shops full of handcrafted wooden wares. And sample authentic Russian cuisine from borscht to beef stroganoff to blueberry jam pancakes. For an unforgettable meal, book a table at a local restaurant specializing in Eurasian fusion. Bite into a freshly baked loaf of rye bread before feasting on platters of dumplings, hearty stews, and smoked fish. With new flavors bursting in your mouth and Russian music in the air, you’ll feel halfway to Moscow! This taste of Siberian culture in pastoral Hulunbuir offers a delicious getaway for the mind and palate.

Watching the moving Milky Way in a yurt

Nightfall over the Hulunbuir Grasslands unveils spectacular starry skies that must be seen to be believed. With nary a skyscraper in sight, the vast expanse opens up to infinite constellations glittering in their full glory. For the optimal astronomical experience, stay overnight in a traditional Mongolian ger. As darkness descends, step outside into the sea of grass. Looking up, marvel at the canopy of stars blazing brighter than imaginable. Pick out cosmic features usually drowned out by light pollution back home - the hazy band of the Milky Way, shooting stars streaking by. With the celestial sphere arching from horizon to horizon, a profound sense of wonder washes over you. You feel at one with the ancient rhythms of the universe, dwarfed by their scale yet connected to their eternal beauty. This cosmic communion under the heavens can only be found in the wide-open spaces of Hulunbuir.

Best Travel Time

The northern part of Hulunbuir City is a forest area, and the best travel seasons are May 20th and mid to late September, when the temperature is suitable and there is no mosquito interference. In May, the trees turned green and the mountains and fields were covered with azaleas; In September, autumn colors spread throughout the Greater Khingan Mountains, making it a great time for photography. The southern region is mainly grassland, with the best travel season from June to August. November to mid February of the following year is the best season for ice and snow tours. The spring and autumn fire prevention period is from March 15th to June 15th and from September 15th to November 15th each year. During this period, if you drive to most areas of Hulunbuir City, you must obtain a fire prevention certificate; The spring fire prevention period is a relatively bleak period of the year in most areas of Hulunbuir City, with only the azaleas that bloom throughout the mountains in the Greater Khingan Mountains forest area in May worth visiting.

Dressing Guidelines

Visiting Hulunbuir from June to August, bulky down jackets and cotton-padded clothes are unnecessary. Short sleeves and pants will likely suffice for daytime, but do pack at least one warm long sleeve layer, as the temperature can drop sharply at night. Beware of active mosquitoes in the summer grasslands, so avoid wearing shorts. Comfortable walking shoes, hats, and sunglasses are essentials. For fall and winter travel, bundle up, as temperatures get extremely cold and can dip below freezing in winter. Down jackets, sweaters, scarves, gloves, and hats are must-haves. Don't forget warm pants and thermal underlayers too. The key is dressing in layers, so you can comfortably adjust to the wide temperature fluctuations in Hulunbuir. With the right versatile clothing packed, you'll be ready to fully enjoy everything this beautiful region of northern China has to offer.

Religion and Culture

Hulunbuir is home to 32 ethnic minority groups including Han, Mongolian, Hui, Manchu, Korean, Daur, Russian, Bai, Li, Xibe, Uyghur, Zhuang, Oroqen, and Ewenki. Among China's 55 officially recognized minorities, only 3 with populations under 100,000 - the Oroqen, Ewenki, and Russians - reside in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, all concentrated in Hulunbuir. Though Han make up the largest share of Hulunbuir's population, the city showcases minority traditions. Manzhouli's Russian heritage is evident in log houses, intricate lamps and curtains, and signature Russian fare like bread, milk, and sour soups. Bread and salt represent the highest Russian hospitality. Men often wear suits and fur hats while women don floral dresses or skirt suits. Wedding customs are elaborate. Russians tend to be soft-spoken in public. Hulunbuir's diverse ethnic makeup immerses visitors in a mosaic of Chinese minority customs, foods, dress, festivals, music, dance, and architecture.

Customs taboos

When driving through the grasslands or visiting herders, avoid startling livestock by giving them ample space, as startled animals may lose their footing. Likewise, drivers and pedestrians should circumvent herds, rather than cut through, to avoid disrespecting the owners. When visiting yurts, first check for tethered horses to avoid spooking them into breaking free. Enter through the left of the stove and sit in the west or north, avoiding the master's space in the east. Avoid blocking buddha images above the kang bed. Sitting on the floor is fine - no need to remove shoes. Do not sit on the threshold. When offered milk tea, cradle the bowl in both hands, never the left alone, to demonstrate etiquette. Gently tap the rim to decline more tea. Serving spirits is traditional Mongolian hospitality. Beautiful songs accompany liquor in silver bowls, golden cups, or horn vessels presented on hada scarves. Declining drinks through repeated gestures is seen as insincere. Teetotalers can simply sip to reciprocate the gesture. With mindfulness and respect for local customs, guests will find a warm welcome in Hulunbuir.

Self driving

Hulunbuir's road transportation network consists of national highways like the Beijing-Hailar G110 and the Suifenhe-Manzhouli G301, provincial highways like Heihe-Heishantou, Labudalin-Amu Goolang, and Manzhouli-Alatan Emuole, as well as county, border control, and dedicated roads.

Driving on the grassland highways offers boundless green vistas and azure blue skies for a thrilling experience. However, note that Hulunbuir is extremely distant from cities in central, southern, and parts of northern China. Self-driving may not be economical or feasible for long distances - consider an organized tour bus instead.

For more localized trips within Inner Mongolia, rental cars from Hailar and Manzhouli provide freedom to discover Hulunbuir’s natural wonders. Carefully calculate distances and fuel needs before setting out. Driving the grasslands rewards adventurous travelers with wide open spaces and rarely glimpsed nomadic culture. Just be prepared for the challenges of this remote region’s roads.

Emergency call

Here is a suggested paragraph about safety tips in Changhua, Taiwan for an English travel website:Staying Safe in Changhua, TaiwanChanghua is generally very safe, but you should take some basic precautions. Keep valuables secured and be alert in public areas to prevent petty theft. A special note for Southern Taiwan including Kaohsiung, Tainan, and Kenting - avoid discussing politics as tensions can run high in this region. However, southerners are usually still very warm and friendly, even towards mainland Chinese tourists.Use common sense, take care of belongings, and avoid political conversations in the south. Following basic safety measures will allow you to fully enjoy your travels in Changhua and the rest of Taiwan.

Tourism consulting

When at crowded places like train stations, bus terminals, and metro stations, keep a close eye on your belongings to prevent theft. Areas with high tourist traffic like Tiananmen Square also attract scammers, so tourists should be wary of unlicensed guides demanding money upfront. Avoid handing over any cash to solicitations on the street. Use registered taxi companies like the red Beijing taxis whenever possible. Keep valuables secured and hidden, avoid carrying large amounts of cash, and be alert in public transportation hubs and tourist sites. When needing assistance, go to authorized help points like the Beijing Tourist Information booths rather than individuals roaming the streets. Beijing is a generally safe city if simple precautions are taken. Report any incidents or suspicious activities immediately to the nearest police officer. They can also provide directions and other help. Enjoy sightseeing, but remain aware of the surroundings.

Medical treatment

Here is a suggested paragraph about safety tips in Changhua, Taiwan for an English travel website:Staying Safe in Changhua, TaiwanChanghua is generally very safe, but you should take some basic precautions. Keep valuables secured and be alert in public areas to prevent petty theft. A special note for Southern Taiwan including Kaohsiung, Tainan, and Kenting - avoid discussing politics as tensions can run high in this region. However, southerners are usually still very warm and friendly, even towards mainland Chinese tourists.Use common sense, take care of belongings, and avoid political conversations in the south. Following basic safety measures will allow you to fully enjoy your travels in Changhua and the rest of Taiwan.

Equipment

When at crowded places like train stations, bus terminals, and metro stations, keep a close eye on your belongings to prevent theft. Areas with high tourist traffic like Tiananmen Square also attract scammers, so tourists should be wary of unlicensed guides demanding money upfront. Avoid handing over any cash to solicitations on the street. Use registered taxi companies like the red Beijing taxis whenever possible. Keep valuables secured and hidden, avoid carrying large amounts of cash, and be alert in public transportation hubs and tourist sites. When needing assistance, go to authorized help points like the Beijing Tourist Information booths rather than individuals roaming the streets. Beijing is a generally safe city if simple precautions are taken. Report any incidents or suspicious activities immediately to the nearest police officer. They can also provide directions and other help. Enjoy sightseeing, but remain aware of the surroundings.

Hulunber Surrounding Cities